Migration is a global problem, an issue yet to be resolved

The number of migrants fleeing to Europe by the Mediterranean Sea has dropped. However, it is more and more apparent that migration is a global issue.

Once the United States and Europe tightened their border controls, countries like Malaysia and South Korea became appealing. Most of the people seeking refuge in those countries are in fact economic migrants – young African and Arab adults. Also, they only want to reach their desired destination, as the American ‘caravan’ showed recently when refused an offer to stay in Mexico.

From the European point of view, the main problem is immigration from Africa. In many countries, liberation from colonial rule has not met people’s expectations. Even though the overall economic figures have been rather positive, GDP has been rising slowly and even falling in some cases.

It’s partly due to an extreme increase in the population across Northern Africa and Sub-Saharan countries. In general, the GDP of African states is volatile. The high unemployment rate around 10 – 15 percent in the North is even higher when it comes to young people. And foreign aid doesn’t bring an ultimate solution, billions and billion have been flowing there since 2000, many countries have seen their debt or a large part of it forgiven. Yet only the elite profit, while the poverty index doesn't change. 

Not even successful projects in the fields of oil extraction and resources management are benefiting the people. They almost entirely benefit only foreign investors and the local kleptocrats. That combined with recurrent famine caused by climate change, active militias, and tribal wars, it’s evident that migrant flow is not going to stop.

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