Commentary Great history

The golden age of Central Europe

Will history repeat itself and the countries of Central Europe shine again? Igor Szczęsnowicz draws comparisons between the current social and international situation of Europe to that of the 14th century.

A long, long time ago in the 14thcentury, very peculiar things happened throughout the world. It turned out that Western Europe, which had until then radiated civilizational and cultural achievements and had been the engine of universal development, had begun to fall into the abyss of chaos and regression.

This was due to many internal frictions, a disease which arrived from the Middle East and religious conflicts.

Central Europe bloomed and over the course of the next few decades of the 14thcentury its countries: Poland, Hungary and the Kingdom of Bohemia, became world powers

In the East, the Byzantine civilization was degenerating, mainly due to the pressure and vassalling of Byzantine emperors by the Ottoman Turks. 

Meanwhile, Central Europe bloomed and over the course of the next few decades of the 14thcentury its countries: Poland, Hungary and the Kingdom of Bohemia, became world powers. 

Hungary lost that status after the Turkish incursion in the 16thcentury. The Czechs lost it due to religious wars in the 15th. Poland held its position of power for the longest – up until the middle of the 17thcentury. 

The international situation of the 14thcentury eerily reminds us of the one of today. I hope that history really likes to repeat itself. 

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