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ACTA2 EU Intellectual Property Internet Poland Commentary

ACTA2 could spell the end of unlimited freedom on the Internet

“When politicians are engaged with something, with freedom at stake, you can bet that something will go wrong – in the direction of limiting that freedom,” writes Robert Gwiazdowski. Here is how and why ACTA2 will limit internet freedom.

editor: REMIX NEWS
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The European Parliament voted in favor of the directive concerning creator rights and protection of intellectual property in the single electronic market. Some believe that politicians care about “just” rewards for creators. Some politicians probably don’t even know what the whole thing was about. It’s about creating instruments which will allow control of content distribution.

Just like the progressive income tax is more of a pretext for surveillance of taxpayers than some made up “just redistribution” of gross national income. The same goes for RODO, which supposedly wasn’t about not letting parents contact hospitals after a bus crash to know what’s happening to their children. As Murphy’s law states, “if something can go wrong, it will.” And when politicians are engaged with something, with freedom at stake, you can bet that it will.

It will take some time for us to see that we can’t publish or read something because of “copyright laws”. Therefore, although it’s not yet clear, the hashtag #ACTA2 is adequate

What’s more, the RODO laws, compared to the now infamous Article 13 of the new directive on copyright, are clearly and succinctly written!

Article 13 deals with the “usage” of protected content of not only “pieces” but also “other items” uploaded by “users”.

Let’s look at the laws surrounding: the police, tax audits, and the Intelligence Agency. Based on their operations, special and secret services will have access to everything “legal entities” will want to have. Not on the basis of “cooperation” but under the law. What’s more, we will pay for the development of these “means” and “technology” through payments to internet providers.

As always, only the short-term positive results of regulations are shown – those who use someone’s content should pay for it. But there are those results, which aren’t immediately visible. It will take some time for us to see that we can’t publish or read something because of “copyright laws”. Therefore, although it’s not yet clear, the hashtag #ACTA2 is adequate.