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Alexey Likhachev Hungary János Süli Nuclear Power Plant Rosatom Russia News

Hungary set to install state-of-the-art nuclear reactors

editor: REMIX NEWS
author: Magyar Nemzet/MTI

Hungary’s two new reactors at its only nuclear power station, Paks, will feature cutting-edge technology that will improve efficiency, energy production and security.The introduction of the cutting-edge technology was announced by the government commissioner in charge of the project, János Süli, and Rosatom CEO Alexey Likhachev.

Likhachev said the complex permissions process to implement the technology has arrived at a key stage, with 400 various approvals already secured. Now the full package will be submitted to the National Nuclear Energy Office.

Süli said the tender for supplying the control systems was won by the French-German Framatome-Siemens consortium while the turbines will be delivered by the American-French General Electric-Alstom consortium.

Huge boost for Hungary’s energy production

He also pointed out that the two new planned reactors, each with 1,200 megawatts of capacity, are of the latest III+ generation that is compliant with all current safety standards.

Hungary’s only nuclear plant, located approximately 100 kilometers south of Budapest, currently has a capacity of 2,000 megawatts. The addition of the two VVER pressurized water reactors will add another 2,400 megawatts to that.

The first reactor is planned to become operational in 2025 and the second in 2027.

The existing four units were built by the Soviet Union in the 1980s, with the last of the four coming online in 1987. They have an expected lifespan until the end of the 2030s.

The two new reactors have a planned lifespan of sixty years. Süli said such a power upgrade with conventional systems would produce  17 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year, while the nuclear plants would feature zero emissions.

He also said that the full documentation of the project will be completed next year and will meet both Hungarian and European Union safety standards.


Title image: Current Paks nuclear reactor (source: Wikipedia/ChNPP)