Large majority of Poles reject euro currency

Voters of the ruling United Right are the most opposed to the common currency at over 97%, while 43% of the opposition’s voters are also against the euro

editor: Grzegorz Adamczyk
author: Radio Zet

Almost 65 percent of Poles are against the euro currency being introduced to Poland, a new survey by the Institute of Economic and Social Research (IBRiS) for commercial Radio ZET shows. At the same time, only 24.5 percent of all respondents want the euro currency.

Respondents who “strongly disagree” are the largest group, 49 percent, while 15.2 percent “rather disagree” on adopting the euro in Poland, and another 11.3 percent answered, “I do not know/it is hard to say.”

In contrast, 14.7 percent of the respondents “strongly agree” with the thesis: “Poland should adopt the euro instead of the Polish zloty,” while 9.8 percent “rather agree.”

Voters of the ruling United Right are the most opposed to the common currency, at over 97 percent; while 43 percent of the opposition’s voters are also against the euro. Nearly the same percentage of the opposition voters, 44 percent, support the introduction of the euro.

Most respondents who do not want the zloty to be replaced with the euro live in the countryside, with 70 percent against the introduction of the euro; 75 percent of those in small towns with up to 50,000 inhabitants are also against the move.

In larger cities with over 250,000 inhabitants, the opinions are split, with 48 percent not wanting the euro and 42 percent supporting its introduction.

The poll results come shortly after Croatia was accepted into the eurozone, which immediately led to a price surge across the country. Critics of the move say that there was strong opposition to introducing the currency in the country and the government nevertheless moved forward with the decision with little public debate or input.

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