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Belgians are now a minority in their own capital of Brussels

In ten years, the percentage of foreigners in Belgium rose to 32 percent

editor: REMIX NEWS
author: Dénes Albert

For the first time, Belgians have become a minority in their own capital of Brussels, which incidentally is also the de facto capital of the European Union, Belgian Pmagazine reports based on data from the country’s statistics office.

The politically correct term for this development is called “diversity”, but the less “correct” term, but the one that may be just as appropriate, is “colonization”. In Brussels-City, where the coronavirus figures are skyrocketing, nearly 80 percent of the population is of foreign origin.

This is the first time that Statbel, the Belgian statistics agency, has thus mapped the origin of the Belgian population. The census was taken not only by counting current nationalities, but also those of parents. If the first nationality with which an individual or at least their parents entered in the national register was not Belgian, then that person is not considered of Belgian ethnic, according to the statistical agency.

Ten years ago, 74.9 percent of the inhabitants of all of Belgium were still “Belgian Belgians”, as the statistical office refers to ethnic Belgians. Today that ratio it is 67.9 percent, marking a serious drop in the number of Belgians.

On Jan. 1, 2020, the kingdom’s population consisted of 67.9 percent Belgians of Belgian origin, 19.7 percent of Belgians of foreign origin (i.e. Belgians with one or two parents of foreign nationality or Belgians whose first registered nationality is foreign) and the remaining 12.4 percent are non-Belgians. This represents respectively 7,806,078, 2,259,912 and 1,426,651 inhabitants.

These trends are occuring  Western countries. For example, France’s native population has been following and could become a minority within the next decades, which holds true for Norway as well. 

The diversity of origin within the population living in Belgium is increasing because 10 years ago, in 2010, the share of Belgians of Belgian origin was 74.3 percent, that of Belgians of foreign origin 15.5 percent and that of non-Belgians 10.2 percent.

The proportion of Belgians of Belgian origin also increases with age. In Belgium, it reaches 54.3 percent among 0-17 year olds, 66.3 among 18-64 year olds and 87.3 among over 65s.