French people moving towards becoming a minority, and it will have ‘serious’ consequences, warns French-Algerian author and former politician

“The French government is making a series of decisions that go against the French population and its life, with (society) itself having a majority against immigration,” says Malika Sorel-Sutter

editor: REMIX NEWS
author: John Cody

One of France’s most notable critics of mass immigration, the former politician and best-selling author Malika Sorel-Sutter, says France is seeing massive demographic changes that will make the ethnic French a minority in their own country, which will lead to very serious consequences.

“We are moving towards a minority of the historical people, of the French people, on French territory and it is very serious,” she said during an appearance on Sud Radio where she discussed France’s decision to take in hundreds of migrants from the Ocean Viking NGO rescue ship after Italy refused to accept them. Remix News has translated portions of her interview.

Sorel-Sutter, who was born to Algerian parents and lived in Algeria for 15 years, was once a member of the French Integration Council, which she said gave her a first-hand view of the country’s broken immigration system. She noted during her interview with Sud Radio that the country’s changing demographics will not only drastically transform the country’s electorate, but will also have a knockdown effect on the country’s society, education system, and social programs.

“I would say this will impact the population, the composition of the population, because we see that (migrants) are being offered French nationality. This in turn alters the electorate, which will in turn decide on the social programs and the future, values and morality of society. Schools are also important, not only as economic factors, but also in terms of way of life, co-existence, from which the French state is conspicuously missing, and this will have an impact on how we live together.”

To back her arguments, she points to statistics that outline how the country’s demographics are changing from a native French European population to a foreign-born population, saying, “Ultimately, this will impact society as a whole and this is a very grave matter: in Ile de France (the country’s central region around Paris), 45 percent of newborns have at least one parent of foreign origin. Thus, we have a very grave problem of cultural integration and assimilation. In terms of values and core principles, this will make the historic population (of the country) a minority on French soil.”

She says that the French government is making these decisions on immigration policy that are going against the country’s own population, which is overwhelmingly against accepting more migrants. Other polls show the majority of the French are worried about the Great Replacement, which describes the phenomenon of Europeans being replaced by non-European populations across the West due to mass immigration.

“The French government is making a series of decisions that go against the French population and its life, with (society) itself having a majority against immigration,” she said. “This is a problem because France is already being identified as a ‘social El Dorado’ because it is due to the social (NGO) networks that migrants decide on journeys that endanger their lives.”

She indicated that not only are the French against immigration, but the policy of the French government, which offers generous benefits for illegal migrants — often even after a migrant has been scheduled for deportation — is serving as a draw for future migration. She argues that the French government, therefore, is partly to blame for the drowning deaths that have occurred on the Mediterranean.

“By boarding unsafe ships and boats, they are paying very dearly for the ticket because these are immigration networks. These clandestine networks have become a real business. Through its decisions, the French state is endorsing these networks of human smuggling which often result in their (the migrants’) deaths,” she said.

Sorel-Sutter has become a prominent voice against mass immigration into France, and although she has faced widespread censorship, she is still interviewed by some of the country’s leading newspapers and television shows.

During an interview with Le Figaro earlier this month, where she said that France needs a complete immigration moratorium.

“We can also experience that integration has failed miserably, and we are reminded of that every day, including (through) what’s happening in schools,” she told Le Figaro. “We can see that France is losing ground in the economy, has been losing ground for the past 40 years in parallel with the rise of immigration. And, as the latest talking point, President Emmanuel Macron says that half of the crimes are attributable to foreigners. He was speaking of (crime) in Paris.”

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