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Hungarian Justice Minister Judit Varga. (source: Facebook)
European Commission European Court of Justice Illegal Immigration Judit Varga Hungary

‘Fortress Hungary’ still stands, Hungary’s justice minister tells German paper

The European Court of Justice and the Commission want to force Hungary to take in migrants

editor: REMIX NEWS
author: Dénes Albert
via:

Despite the ruling of the European Court of Justice on Hungary’s so-called “Stop Soros” law and the European Commission’s efforts to impose migrants on the country, “fortress Hungary still stands,” Justice Minister Judit Varga told German daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung in an interview.

In the interview published Saturday in the conservative German newspaper, the Hungarian minister of justice spoke about the ruling of the European Court of Justice on Tuesday that Hungary had violated EU law by criminalizing the activity of facilitating the initiation of asylum proceedings for persons not eligible for international protection.

She said the court was attacking the very law that is intended to protect Europe from illegal migration and its illegal support, “so in essence, the European Court of Justice and the European Commission want Hungary to allow illegal migrants.”

She explained that “the migration system of the European Union is not working,” but Hungary had a “very well-functioning legal system,” which, through the institution of a transit zone closed to the Schengen area and open to secure third countries, “ensured that illegal migration will be reduced across Europe.”

However, transit zones have had to be abolished, so all rejected asylum seekers who cannot be sent back illegally remain in the state, which is “contrary to the principle of sovereignty enshrined in the Basic Law.”

“Regardless of this, we do not allow illegal migrants, Fortress Hungary remains standing,” Varga pointed out.

Varga added that the issue is not whether Community law should be applied, but that “European law is not working effectively.” This is also shown by the crisis on the Lithuanian-Polish border, in which no EU decision could be expected, but “immediate action and creative solutions by sovereign member states were needed,” Varga said.